Empowering Health:

Charleston Oncology Observes National Cancer Prevention Month 

Every year in the United States, nearly 1.9 million people (about twice the population of South Dakota) face the life-altering diagnosis of cancer, according to the National Institutes of Health. Shockingly, 30-50% of these cases are linked to preventable causes.

As we embrace National Cancer Prevention Month, Charleston Oncology stands as a beacon of awareness, striving to reduce the impact of this devastating disease. 

The Power of Prevention: Knowledge as a Shield  

Raising awareness about cancer prevention is vital in reducing the incidence (the number of people affected by oncology diagnosis) and mortality (the number of people with a cancer diagnosis that does not improve with treatment). At Charleston Oncology, we support educating the community on the significance of prevention and self-care.  

Understanding Risk Factors: A Crucial Step to Prevention  

Raising awareness about cancer prevention is vital in reducing the incidence (the number of people affected by oncology diagnosis) and mortality (the number of people with a cancer diagnosis that does not improve with treatment). At Charleston Oncology, we support educating the community on the significance of prevention and self-care.  

6 Tips for Reducing Your Cancer Risk:

1. Avoid All Forms of Tobacco 

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, and cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Typically associated with lung cancer, tobacco can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body. No matter how long you have used tobacco, quitting can reduce your risk for cancer and other chronic diseases.

2. Protect Your Skin 

Skin cancer is the most common kind of cancer in the US, linked to ultra-violet (UV) ray exposure. To help prevent skin cancer while still having fun outdoors, protect yourself by staying in the shade, applying sunscreen, and wearing sun-protective clothing, a hat, and sunglasses.

3. Limit Alcohol Consumption 

Drinking alcohol raises your risk of getting six kinds of cancer. These include cancers of the mouth and throat, voice box (larynx), esophagus, colon and rectum, liver, and breast. The less alcohol you drink, the lower your risk for cancer.

4. Maintain a Healthy Weight 

Being overweight or having obesity are linked with a higher risk of getting 13 types of cancer. Some of these include breast, colorectal, renal, prostate, leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and bladder cancers. Keeping a healthy weight is one of the most important steps you can take to lower your risk of getting cancer.

5. Get Screened 

Active screening prevention is always the first line of defense against cancer. Detecting cancer at an early stage increases the chances of successful treatment and improves long-term survival rates. That’s why regular screenings play a crucial role in cancer prevention. 

Check out the Cancer Screening Guidelines by Age.

6. Get Immunized  

Certain vaccines, like the HPV vaccine, prevent infections leading to cancer. Staying current with vaccinations is a proactive measure. 

Explore the CDC’s comprehensive guide on cancer risk factors.

Charleston Oncology: Your Partner in Prevention 

At Charleston Oncology, we believe that knowledge empowers, and prevention is a shared responsibility. Our commitment to educating the community on prevention and self-care aims to reduce the prevalence of preventable cancers. Join us during National Cancer Prevention Month in taking control of your health. Let knowledge guide your choices, and let prevention be the cornerstone of a healthier future. 

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